Who is Whitney Wright? Porn Star’s Visit to Iran Sparks Outrage

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Unless you’re familiar with OnlyFans, you may not have heard of Whitney Wright, but the porn star has gone viral for an unusual reason.

The 32-year-old has been accused of promoting the Islamic Republic of Iran after posting photos from a recent visit to Tehran to social media. The country has been criticized for flouting human rights norms, with accusations that women, LGBTQ people and minorities suffer under the regime.

Wright, whose real name is Brittni Rayne Whittington, shared snaps to her social media accounts on Monday from several locations in the capital city, sparking fierce backlash.

Left, Whitney Wright during her Iran visit and, right, posing for a selfie. The Only Fans star sparked outrage with her trip to Iran.

Instagram: @whitneywrightxo

What Did Whitney Wright Post About Iran on Instagram?

Adhering to the country’s strict dress code for women, which includes a hijab and long, loose-fitting garments, Wright visited Sadabaad Palace, the International Arts Museum and the abandoned U.S. Embassy to Instagram.

“Tehran ~ a sweet glimpse,” the Oklahoma native wrote in the caption, along with a heart emoji. Newsweek has reached out to Whitney Wright for comment via Instagram.

She also posted the photos to X, formerly Twitter, although her account appears to have since been deactivated.

Social media users have condemned Wright, seeing her trip as an endorsement of Iran’s government.

“Shame on you. You have supported one the most brutal regimes in the world just when you arrived Iran,” commented Dowda on her Instagram post.

Amir Pooya agreed, writing: “You are helping propaganda of a misogynistic murderous regime.”

“We are Iranians and we have a strong desire to escape from Iran, but unfortunately we are stuck here,” said Alireza. “I don’t know what you think, but Iran is not a good place.”

“If You Respect the Law, You’ll Be Safe in Iran.”

Responding to comments from users on X, Wright reportedly wrote: “If you respect the law, you will be safe in Iran.” This appears to be a reference to the country’s dress code, also known as the “hijab bill.”

Newsweek was unable to verify the comment because of the inaccessibility of Wright’s account, but Iranian-American journalist Masih Alinejad cited it in a tweet.

When confronting Wright on X, Alinejad said the adult film star had called her a “warmonger.”

“Iranian women don’t want to obey a discriminatory law,” Alinejad posted, hitting out at Wright’s alleged comment about dress codes and safety.

“And by the way, the true warmongers are the agents of the Islamic Republic who will execute you if you be true to yourself,” she said.

As the backlash intensified, Wright turned off the comments on her X post, telling users: “Posting photos of my trip to Iran does not mean approval of the government.”

What Did the Islamic Republic of Iran Say About Whitney Wright?

In a news conference, Nasser Kanani, a spokesperson for Iran’s foreign ministry, said he had no knowledge of Wright’s visit. However, he added that “it is not forbidden” for U.S. citizens to visit Iran.

The visa system was also reportedly “not aware of the nature of her immoral and obscene occupation,” a source told the Iranian state news agency Tasnim.

The insider also confirmed that Wright had “not been invited by any organization and traveled to Tehran on her own after obtaining a visa.”

The production of pornography has been illegal in Iran since 2007 and can result in the death penalty. A representative for the State Department told the Associated Press that Americans should avoid the country because of the risk of “wrongful detention.”

Wright and the U.S. Embassy

Wright’s visit to the former U.S. embassy in particular caused a stir. In 1979, the embassy was the site of the Iran hostage crisis, where Iranian militants held 66 American citizens captive, 52 of whom were held for more than a year, with the siege lasting 444 days. The incident soured relations between the U.S. and Iran, with the embassy now home to an anti-American museum.

On X, Wright said she “HAD to visit” the site, taking a photo alongside a lowered American flag.

“I’m sharing exhibits from a museum that are never seen,” Wright replied to an Instagram comment. “It’s not an endorsement of the government.”

What Are Whitney Wright’s Political Beliefs?

Since the outbreak of the Israel-Hamas war last year, Wright has been a staunch supporter of Palestinians and a vocal critic of Israel.

On October 7, Hamas militants attacked southern Israel, killing 1,200 people and taking 240 hostages, according to the AP. Israel declared war on Hamas, which is based in the Gaza Strip, launching airstrikes, cutting off supplies and commencing a ground offensive into the territory.

As of February 6, over 27,000 people have been killed in Gaza, according to the AP, citing health authorities in Gaza, while roughly 85 percent of the territory’s 2.3 million population have been made homeless.

While in Iran, Wright reportedly condemned the Iranian government for not celebrating Palestinian revolutionaries such as Ghassan Kanafani, George Habash and Leila Khaled, members of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP).

On Monday, Wright shared numerous screenshots in support of civilians in Gaza to her Instagram stories. These included a “before and after” comparison of Gaza following Israel’s ground offensive and a post slamming Israeli protestors preventing aid trucks from entering the territory.

Wright also screenshotted a comment on Alinejad’s X post criticizing her trip to Iran, which reads: “The diaspora is losing its mind over this visit because it challenges the narrative they’ve been constructing for years now that Iran is this repressive place.

“They’re upset (1) she’s a porn star (2) she’s pro-Palestinian and (3) she doesn’t endorse their pro-sanctions, interventionist ideology.”

Wright’s Instagram Story posts indicate she has left the country. She blasted social media users sharing posts about her Iran visit, asking why a “person who cares so much about women’s safety/autonomy reshare posts about me possibly being in Iran and further jeopardize my safety before you knew I was out of Iran?”